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The Dr Bob McGregor Paediatric Health Research Fund has officially launched!

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The city’s first Paediatrician, Dr Bob McGregor may have officially retired from the Ipswich Hospital Foundation board after many dedicated years of service, but his legacy will continue.

Bob hung up his scrubs for the last time after 47 years in February but remained on the board.

For 21 years, Bob was a major driving force on the board, raising funds for facilities, equipment and research seeking to specifically support paediatric services throughout the city.

But now, he felt it was the right time to step down from his position.

“I was a founding member of the board and I just felt it was the right time to give someone else a go,” said Mr McGregor.

On Wednesday, October 27, the board held a farewell luncheon for their long-serving member and in recognition of his efforts, the foundation presented him with ‘The Dr Bob McGregor Paediatric Health Research Fund.’

The new fund was officially launched on Monday 25 October and has since received an overwhelming response.

“I was so surprised and over the moon when I was presented with the fund,” said Mr McGregor.

“I couldn’t speak, I didn’t expect that at all. And I cannot believe the fund already has gained a substantial amount of funds. I am absolutely chuffed, I mean, I am so happy that I have a bit of drawing power,” he laughed.

Ipswich Hospital Foundation CEO, James Sturges said the new fund will support locally relevant projects aligning with Mr McGregor’s passion for Paediatric Research.

“We are delighted to launch the Bob McGregor Paediatric Research Fund,” Mr Sturges said.

“The fund will aim to support projects which demonstrate high-quality research and innovation techniques that align with Bob’s enthusiasm and approach to the health priorities in the West Moreton region.

“The fund will also aim to recognise and respond to the diverse and growing needs of the West Moreton community.”

Chair of the board, Professor Geraldine Mackenzie said the new fund will aim to recognise and respond to the diverse and growing needs of the West Moreton community.

“Our community encompasses the West Moreton Hospital and Health Service area servicing the City of Ipswich and the Regional Councils of Somerset, Scenic Rim and Lockyer Valley,” said Ms Mackenzie.

“We are grateful to have had Bob on the board servicing these regions for more than 20 years and we wish him all the best with his future endeavours.”

For the past five months, Mr McGregor has been collaborating with the University of Queensland to research the health of children growing up in the 21st century.

“I’m hoping that the funds will go into meaningful research into the rising mental and physical health problems we see now in children and young adolescents,” said Mr McGregor.

“I’m hoping to develop a very strong evidence base to link to the fact that 25 per cent of young people are affected now by mental health.

“This was something I never saw in private practice 47 years ago, and there’s a lot of research to be done.”

Mr McGregor said he will use his spare time to continue his research, spend time with his wife and family, travel in his caravan and pick up his guitar once again.

 

To donate to The Dr Bob McGregor Paediatric Health Research Fund, visit https://www.ihfoundation.org.au/give/.

Bike4Life School Holiday Program

By | Fitness, Health, Initiatives, Projects, Uncategorized | One Comment

CYCLE SAFELY COURSE

Are your kids cycling safe? Enrol now for the school holiday Bike4Life Cycling Education Program (2-3 October) presented by Ipswich Hospital Foundation and Sekisui House.

The 2-hour course to be held at Pebbles Park, Ripley will teach basic bike riding skills, build your child’s confidence to remove training wheels, increase awareness of surroundings, and gain the knowledge to be safe while riding.

To register please visit: www.ihfoundation.org.au/events/

Does your diet require fortification? with Dee Taylor, Nutritionist

By | Health, Uncategorized | No Comments

Does your diet require fortification?

with Dee Taylor, Nutritionist

Fortification, by the addition of vitamins and minerals to foods, aims to reduce shortfalls in everyday dietary intakes. Some people purposely seek out these products looking for a nutritional advantage but on a general level, food fortification provides benefits to people at risk of dietary deficiencies. Vegetarians, pregnant women and people who omit whole food groups from their diet are just a few who benefit from fortified food products. Even if you don’t intentionally buy them, check the food labels on your current foods in your fridge and pantry; you may be surprised to find you already consume them.

In Australia, fortifying certain foods are mandatory to address a public health concern, such as with a population vitamin and mineral deficiency or those that affects a large proportion of the population or it can be voluntary where vitamins or mineral are added to a manufactured product. Food Standards Australia and New Zealand (FSANZ) oversee the amounts added for fortification purposes and require food manufacturers to supply evidence for health claims on their products and they must be labelled. This is why it is always important to read your food labels – you should always know what you are eating.

Below are examples of vitamins and minerals used for fortification in Australia.

Folic acid – this is a mandatory and added to wheat flour used for making breads, bread rolls and muffins (organic breads do not require this).

Iodine – iodized salt used in bread making (again except in organic breads).

Plant Sterols – these can be (but not always) used in margarines, low fat milks/cheese/yogurts.

Do you need to buy non-mandatory fortified food products?

This is where you need to reflect on your own dietary intake. Do you get an adequate intake of vitamins and minerals in your existing diet or do you limit certain foods that have significant health impacts?

If you drink more juice than milk, you may want to consider looking for one that has added calcium. Another is iron-fortified bread and cereal products. If you fail to eat an adequate amount of iron in your diet through sources such as red meats, lentils, beans or leafy green vegetables having a low-sugar cereal or bakery product that has iron added may help to increase low levels.

Omega-3’s fatty acids are essential for brain development and heart health and can’t be produced in the body and need to be sourced in our diet. They are commonly consumed when eating oily fish, tuna, sardines, nuts, seeds and oils such as canola, flaxseed and even olive oil. If, however, you are vegetarian, don’t eat seafood and have a low intake of plant-based sources, omega-3 fortified eggs, yoghurt, juice and even milk are available. These are only just a few examples to highlight that fortification is available in everyday foods and that you don’t need to look hard to source them. They are becoming more expansive with more and more products are becoming available in our supermarkets – go for a walk down the breads and cereal aisle and you will see you are not short of fortified choices!

Even though readily available, you may still be questioning whether fortified products are right for you? Having a nutritious healthy, balanced diet from a variety of food sources is always the best way to try and meet your body’s vitamin and mineral requirements but this is not always possible. Reflect on your own diet, learn more about what nutrients your body needs and the food sources they are derived – and importantly, look around at the supermarket, read your labels to know what you are eating. If you do however feel you are nutritionally deficient or could benefit from healthier eating habits, consult with your health practitioner or nutritionist for advice on dietary improvement strategies.

 

Information sourced: Food Standards Australia New Zealand.